Lord of the Flies

by William Golding

Forbes "30 under 30":
Colleges they don't talk about.

Forbes "30 under 30": <br/>Colleges they don't talk about.
Forbes_30_under_30_vs_60second Recap_15_over_50_percent

We like Forbes. We really do.

Forbes "30 under 30" is an annual celebration of the United States' most incandescent twenty-somethings. An amazing group—inventors, artists, moguls, dreamers. Doers of the new generation.

It's no surprise to find graduates of the world's most prestigious and competitive colleges within the ranks of Forbes' "30 under 30". (Forbes names 30 honorees under 30 years of age in 15 different industry categories, which really means it should be called "450 under 30," but that's a detail.) No surprise to find recent graduates of Harvard, Stanford, Princeton, Princeton, Princeton.

No surprise because Forbes tells you so.

But Forbes doesn't say where all, or even most, of its "30 under 30" stars went to college. So we wondered: What's up with that? What would we find if we hunted down the college affiliation of every name on the "30 under 30" list?

david rusenko

David Rusenko, Weebly: "I met both of my Weebly co-founders at Penn State."

We figured we might not find Forbes' "30 under 30" honorees in "Music" or "Sports" or "Hollywood" to be all-Ivy. But what about "Tech"? Or "Social Entrepreurship"? Or "Finance"? We'd taken a long, hard look at Forbes' "30 under 30” roster. We felt pretty certain that Forbes' "30 under 30” honor roll was largely comprised of elite college graduates.

Well, we dug. We searched for the names of every college attended by every Forbes "30 under 30" honoree.

Forbes "30 under 30": Guess what we found?

We found that appearances can be deceiving. We found that Forbes tells of one "30 under 30" honoree's experience as an undergraduate at Duke, but doesn't mention Arizona State University undergraduate degrees carried by three of its young stars. (Fun fact: Arizona State, which accepts 89% of its applicants, has more "30 under 30" alumni than The University of Chicago, which boasts an acceptance rate below 9%. Arizona State beats Duke on this score, too. And it beats Dartmouth. And Cornell. And Johns Hopkins. And...you get the idea.)

Parisa Tabriz, Google Chrome security manager. Google publicity photo.

Parisa Tabriz, Google: "University of Illinois has a world-class college of engineering."

We found that most Forbes "30 under 30" honorees attended, well, ordinary colleges—in some cases, obscure places, in other cases, state schools like the University of Where-They-Just-So-Happened-To-Live-At-The-Time. We found graduates of these institutions in every Forbes "30 under 30" category.

We found that "ordinary" does not mean "mediocre." These places can have world-beating strengths. (Here's what Parisa Tabriz, of  the "tech" category, says about the University of Illinois.) They can offer academic and social cultures with a "just-right" fit to bring out your best. (Here's what Isaac Kinde, of the "science and health" category, says about the University of Maryland, Baltimore County.) So let's not call them "ordinary." Let's call them "normal." Because if you're a conscientious student with good grades, you're in. Which sounds pretty normal to us.

Isaac_Kinde

Isaac Kinde, Johns Hopkins: University of Maryland, Baltimore County "changed my life."

Perhaps you've heard that more than half the members of the U.S. Senate attended state universities. Or that more than 80% of the CEOs of the world’s biggest companies didn’t graduate from Ivy League colleges. Perhaps you've wondered whether those statistics applied only to your parents’ generation. Whether some new normal put anonymous elite college admissions bureaucrats in charge of your destiny.

Forbes "30 under 30." Deconstructed.

Wonder no more: Our crawl through the educational resumes of these Forbes "30 under 30" superstars tells us that nothing much has changed. Sure, Forbes' "30 under 30" list is peppered with alumni of places that drive high school seniors to frenzy—places like Stanford (admit rate: 5.7%) and Harvard (admit rate: 6%). But we found these elite college alumni standing, shoulder-to-shoulder, with grads from dozens of colleges that admit more than half of their applicants. Sometimes a lot more.

We've scoured the bios of each of the Forbes winners and identified the least selective colleges represented in each one of their 15 “30 under 30" career categories. In every category, we found colleges that admitted more than half of their applicants. That’s why we call our list Recap’s “15 over 50%": Because we've highlighted 15 alma maters of Forbes "30 under 30" honorees that accept more than 50% of their applicants.

Take a look and you tell us: Does a prestigious college make you successful in life? Or do you do that for yourself?

To put it another way: Is your life really over if you don’t get into Yale?

60second Recap's 15 over 50%

 

logo_of_university_of_houston_#15 – UNIVERSITY OF HOUSTON

FORBES 30 UNDER 30 CATEGORY - MEDIA

PERCENTAGE OF APPLICANTS ADMITTED: 56%

U.S. News ranks University of Houston 190th on its list of national universities. But when Forbes editors picked their featured star of “‘30 under 30’ in Media,” they chose a recent University of Houston graduate, Matt Mullenweg, as the headliner. And here's an awkward wrinkle, at least for an article about colleges Forbes editors don't mention: They did indeed mention Matt's University of Houston pedigree.

But rules are rules: The University of Houston is the least selective college represented in Forbes' "Media" cluster, so the University of Houston wins the "Media" slot in the Recap's "15 over 50%." And consider this: Matt was a University of Houston freshman when he launched the open source blogging platform, WordPress. Today, WordPress is used by one out of every five websites (including Forbes and 60second Recap). So if you're going to write about Mullenweg, you're going to write about the University of Houston. Bottom line: Houston merits a Forbes mention because of its role in Matt's great American success story. The rest of the Recap's "15 over 50%" aren't so lucky.

UMBC_Seal#14 – UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND, BALTMORE COUNTY

FORBES 30 UNDER 30 CATEGORY - SCIENCE & HEALTHCARE

PERCENTAGE OF APPLICANTS ADMITTED: 61%

When you think STEM, you think of MIT. Or Stanford. Or Princeton, Johns Hopkins, Duke. Certainly that’s what you’d think of after reading Forbes’ “‘30 under 30’ in Science & Healthcare.” But University of Maryland, Baltimore CountyForbes won’t tell you. We will: One the fastest-rising “30 under 30” stars is a member of UMBC's class of 2005. His name is Isaac Kinde. He’s a molecular biologist. You'll find a quick overview of the DNA sequencing technologies he developed to diagnose cancer without surgery or other invasive techniques here.

Something Forbes will tell you: Isaac is now an M.D.-Ph.D. candidate at the world-leading Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine (and wrapping things up this year). Something Isaac will tell you himself (if you ask): Why he turned down Stanford to attend UMBC.

Bee#13 – SAVANNAH COLLEGE OF ART AND DESIGN

FORBES 30 UNDER 30 CATEGORY - ART & STYLE

PERCENTAGE OF APPLICANTS ADMITTED: 62%

“Art & Style” is one “30 under 30” category in which Forbes editors don’t flaunt gilded academic credentials. Maybe because many of the “30 under 30” stars in “Arts & Style” attended what are, essentially, trade schools for the arts.

Claire Rosen, for example, graduated from Savannah College of Art and Design. Her BFA in photography has served as her foundation for a globe-straddling career in fashion and advertising photography. Nice work, if you can get it. And a degree from Awesome U., it appears, isn’t necessary.

Lewis_and_clark_college_seal#12 – LEWIS AND CLARK COLLEGE

FORBES 30 UNDER 30 CATEGORY - SOCIAL ENTREPRENEURSHIP

PERCENTAGE OF APPLICANTS ADMITTED: 64%

Dream about a better world? Forbes’ winners in the “‘30 under 30’ in Social Entrepreneurship” aren’t dreaming anymore. They’ve started companies, campaigns, and causes to make a reality of their dreams for a healthier, saner planet.

During his sophomore year at Lewis and Clark College in Portland, Oregon, Isaac Holeman started a web network to help people organize around social causes. Since then, he’s gone on to co-found Medic Mobile, harnessing cell phone technology to coordinate health care services for patients in 23 countries, and to secure his Ph.D. in management studies from Cambridge University.

charleston#11 – COLLEGE OF CHARLESTON

FORBES 30 UNDER 30 CATEGORY - SPORTS

PERCENTAGE OF APPLICANTS ADMITTED: 68%

News flash! LeBron James didn’t go to college! Really, though, do you care?

In Forbes’ “‘30 under 30’ in Sports,” you’ll find star athletes like James, who turned pro right out of high school, and star athletes like Derrick Rose, who turned pro after a full-ride athletic scholarship at the University of Memphis.

But we decided not to focus on those outliers. Instead, we homed in on those “30 under 30” stars in sports management and marketing. The ones who make the machinery of professional athletics spin and hum. Corporate sprinters like Rebecca Whitener, who’s parlayed a B.S. in psychology and exercise science from the College of Charleston to a star turn as Director of Advanced Media Business Development for Major League Baseball. Her play: Negotiating digital distribution partnerships and expanding Major League Baseball’s licensing and tech service activities on the web.

westminster_logo_2#10 – WESTMINSTER COLLEGE

FORBES 30 UNDER 30 CATEGORY - FINANCE

PERCENTAGE OF APPLICANTS ADMITTED: 69.5%

Harvard, Princeton, Stanford. A quick glance at Forbes’ “‘30 under 30’ in Finance” might suggest that only elite college bluebloods play the big money game. But poke around a bit, and you’ll find recent grads from places Forbes doesn’t mention. Places like City University of New York, Santa Clara University, and Westminster College in Salt Lake City, Utah.

With a near 70% admit rate last year and a 22nd place rank amongst regional universities in the western United States, Westminster may not be seen as a trophy school. But it gave Ray Bradford the education he needed to win admittance to Stanford’s Graduate School of Business, credentials he leveraged into stellar career opportunities at Twitter and Amazon. Ray graduated from Westminster College just six years ago, and he’s already a partner at leading venture capital firm Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers.

MSU_Seal_2010_svg#9 – MICHIGAN STATE

FORBES 30 UNDER 30 CATEGORY - LAW & POLICY

PERCENTAGE OF APPLICANTS ADMITTED: 71%

There they go again. For the “‘30 under 30’ in Law & Policy,” the Forbes editors make it look like only Ivy-anointed need apply. (OK, Georgetown isn’t an Ivy, but you know what we mean.) But look behind the shiny blurbs, and you’ll see a liberal representation of more ordinary institutions of higher learning.

For example: As a policy expert on climate change at Washington, D.C.’s Environmental Law Institute, Cory Connolly has a voice in some of the most vexing international environmental issues of our time. Even though he’s just 24, and packing a B.A. in International Relations from Michigan State University.

indiana#8 – INDIANA UNIVERSITY, BLOOMINGTON

FORBES 30 UNDER 30 CATEGORY - ENERGY

PERCENTAGE OF APPLICANTS ADMITTED: 74%

Would it shock you to learn that the editors of Forbes’ “‘30 under 30’ in Energy” tell us when someone’s a graduate of Stanford, or MIT, or Princeton, or UChicago, or UPenn, or Yale…but not an Indiana University alum? Nothing shocks us anymore, either.

So meet Russell Conard, who founded Ornicept while studying informatics at Indiana University (class of 2012). He’s developing an artificial intelligence system that detects hawks and other birds near wind farms. The application could earn a fortune from developers facing public pressure to protect avian wildlife—no Ivy League education required.

Drexel-University-Logo_#7 – DREXEL UNIVERSITY

FORBES 30 UNDER 30 CATEGORY - MARKETING

PERCENTAGE OF APPLICANTS ADMITTED: 75%

If you think you want to go into marketing, great news! The field is booming and is projected to keep booming. In fact, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, “market researcher” will be among the fastest-growing occupations in the U.S. economy. And if Forbes’ list of “‘30 under 30’ in Marketing” is any guide, you can go to just about any college you want to prepare yourself for a great career.

Of course, for the purposes of 60second Recap’s 15 over 50%, we’re picking the least competitive college represented in each of the 15 Forbes “30 under 30” occupational categories. In the category of “marketing,” the prize goes to Drexel University. Its recent grad Steph Parker received a B.A. in Communications. Now she’s a social media guru at leading advertising firm Hill Holliday.

university-of-iowa-logo#6 – UNIVERSITY OF IOWA

FORBES 30 UNDER 30 CATEGORY - EDUCATION

PERCENTAGE OF APPLICANTS ADMITTED: 78%

Oh, Forbes, Forbes, Forbes. We know your owner is a Princeton grad, but sheesh: Don’t you ever worry about laying on the Ivy love a little too thick? Forbes’ “‘30 under 30’ in Education” is choc-a-bloc with grads of the nation’s finest institutions of higher learning. (Curiously, there's not an actual teacher in the bunch. Interesting...) Perhaps it's no surprise to see Ivy climbing over Forbes' "30 under 30" edu-fraternity: Clearly, these folks know how to study, so "education" could be a natural fit.

Nevertheless, a solid state school pedigree clearly hasn’t hurt University of Iowa alum David Tjaden, a front-line lobbyist and activist for the National Education Association. As chairperson of the NEA’s student program, David writes that he represents “the interests of 60,000+ future educators on policy issues at federal, state and local levels.”

wesleyan#5 – NEBRASKA WESLEYAN

FORBES 30 UNDER 30 CATEGORY - FOOD

PERCENTAGE OF APPLICANTS ADMITTED: 82%

Food. Now there’s an industry that’s moved up from the servants’ quarters. Fortunately, its vertiginous rise in income and prestige has not been accompanied by academic snobbery…yet. In fact, we found just three Ivy Leaguers in Forbes’ “‘30 under 30’ in Food.” As for the rest, it was all over the map. The winner of this category’s 60second Recap “15 over 50” is Nebraska Wesleyan, alma mater of a brilliant and renowned young pastry chef, Alexandra Ray, who has, by accounts, created a key lime cheesecake to die for at New York City’s North End Grill. We’d go taste it, but we’re too busy compiling this list.

University of Colorado, Boulder mascot#4 – UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO, BOULDER

FORBES 30 UNDER 30 CATEGORY - GAMES & APPS

PERCENTAGE OF APPLICANTS ADMITTED: 87%

Once again, Forbes’ “‘30 under 30’ in Games & Apps” emphasizes that smattering of Stanfords, Harvards, and Yales amidst legions of UC Irvines, UT Dallases, and Arizona States. But we’re used to it by now. Which is why we’re especially delighted to announce the winner of 60second Recap’s “15 over 50%” in Games & Apps: University of Colorado, Boulder.

UC Boulder is the college home of Isaac Squires, who studied computer science there before co-founding Ubooly, a toy company that makes “smart” stuffed animals; they run with an iPhone or iPod embedded inside their fluffy little tummies. He and his wife launched the company with the help of a Kickstarter campaign. Take that, Princeton.

ASU-Sparky-arizona-state-university-asu#3 – ARIZONA STATE UNIVERSITY

FORBES 30 UNDER 30 CATEGORY - TECH

PERCENTAGE OF APPLICANTS ADMITTED: 89%

Technically, Arizona State should win in two categories—Games & Apps and Tech. That’s right. We counted three Arizona State alums in two categories in the Forbes “30 under 30” universe. That’s more than Cornell can claim. Or Duke. Or Dartmouth, or Johns Hopkins, or CalTech. Since Forbes won’t tell you, we thought we would. Arizona State wins 60second Recap's “15 over 50%” in Tech thanks to the efforts of alum Robby Walker, who co-founded Cue, an online service that organizes your digital life.

american river college#1 (TIE) – AMERICAN RIVER COLLEGE

FORBES 30 UNDER 30 CATEGORY - HOLLYWOOD

PERCENTAGE OF APPLICANTS ADMITTED: 100%

In their “‘30 under 30’ in Hollywood” category, Forbes offers a welcome break from the parade of academic pedigrees. A little digging reveals that the scholastic backgrounds of the winners run the gamut—from Harvard to…yep, American River College of Sacramento, California. ARC is the alma mater of Ian Hecox and Anthony Padilla, creators of Smosh, one of YouTube’s most popular channels, with over six million subscribers and two billion video views.

SantaFeCollege-seal#1 (TIE) – SANTA FE COLLEGE

FORBES 30 UNDER 30 CATEGORY - MUSIC

PERCENTAGE OF APPLICANTS ADMITTED: 100%

Of course it’s a tie. What’s the difference between “Hollywood” and “Music” besides, maybe, great facility with Auto-Tune? Forbes’ “‘30 under 30’ in Music,” like its “‘30 under 30’ in Sports,” isn’t heavy on “book learning.” (Katie Perry didn’t go to college! Shocker!)

So we took the same approach that we took with the sports category, focusing on those behind-the-scenes types that make everything run—and who went to college. Sort of. “‘30 under 30’ in Music” inductee Adam Kluger, founder of the Kluger Agency, has built a mini-empire from product placements in music videos and recordings. His training? A two year A.A. degree from this Gainesville, Florida community college. And continuing education at the University of This-Is-Your-Life.


Before you send in your college deposit money, be sure to run the numbers. Check out our college loan debt calculator here. 


Got a question we can help with?

Ask the recap >